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Colin Firth

Colin Firth

Birthday: 10 September 1960, Grayshott, Hampshire, England, UK
Birth Name: Colin Andrew Firth
Height: 187 cm

Colin Andrew Firth was born into an academic family in Grayshott, Hampshire, England. His mother, Shirley Jean (Rolles), was a comparative religion lecturer at the Open University, and his father, Dav ...Show more

Colin Firth
[on working again with former Mamma Mia! (2008) co-star Stellan Skarsgård in The Railway Man (2013) Show more [on working again with former Mamma Mia! (2008) co-star Stellan Skarsgård in The Railway Man (2013)] It's very hard to look at Stellan and not see him in Lycra. Actually, the last time I'd seen him on a film set he was naked. So if there was a haunted look in my eyes, it wasn't because I was contemplating the war in Asia. It was because I'd seen horrors already beyond imagination. Hide
[on the movie version of Mamma Mia! (2008) in which he stars] If you are the kind of person who alwa Show more [on the movie version of Mamma Mia! (2008) in which he stars] If you are the kind of person who always wanted to see middle aged men in tight spandex trying to sing, then this is the film for you. Hide
Forget "trying" to be sexy. That's just gruesome. Forget "trying" to be sexy. That's just gruesome.
And I always thought the biggest failing of Americans was their lack of irony. They are very serious Show more And I always thought the biggest failing of Americans was their lack of irony. They are very serious there! Naturally, there are exceptions... the Jewish, Italian, and Irish humor of the East Coast. (Italian Vogue) Hide
[on his first name] Well it doesn't exactly have a ring to it, does it? It's more the sort of name y Show more [on his first name] Well it doesn't exactly have a ring to it, does it? It's more the sort of name you'd give to your goldfish for a joke. Hide
[on filming Mamma Mia! (2008)] This was quite terrifying, because the guys in this film were really Show more [on filming Mamma Mia! (2008)] This was quite terrifying, because the guys in this film were really out of their comfort zone with the singing thing. And you know, the first thing we did was to record our songs, because you pre-record before you shoot the film. And then you have to shoot it live, which a lot of it was, and it was the fearsome Benny and Björn of ABBA, and they were notorious hard customers, and they booked me three days in the studio to sing a three-minute song. So my mind was reeling with images of myself, you know, floods of Ambian-fueled tears, while I was being shouted out in Swedish by bearded men. But, fortunately, when I met them, they were friendly. There was something in their friendliness that had a reserve to it. I thought, "I'm going to be friendly as long as I'm not crappy". And then half an hour later, they were actually okay. Pierce Brosnan and Stellan walked in and I looked at their faces, I was staring into a vortex of fear, both of them in spirals. And nothing bonds you more than blind terror really. Within a few more minutes, the three of us were like The Andrews Sisters around the mike, you know. Hide
[on losing the girl to both Ralph and Joseph Fiennes] If I want my career to go on, I'm going to hav Show more [on losing the girl to both Ralph and Joseph Fiennes] If I want my career to go on, I'm going to have to find some more Fiennes brothers! However, any similarity between them basically stops at their last name. I was in no way reminded of Ralph by working with Joe. I got on fantastically with both of them. I have huge admiration for them as actors but I couldn't compare them. Hide
The first actor who really blew me away was Paul Scofield in [the movie] A Man for All Seasons (1966 Show more The first actor who really blew me away was Paul Scofield in [the movie] A Man for All Seasons (1966). I'd never seen such integrity in acting, and it struck me as a fascinating paradox because acting is artifice. It can be argued to be entirely false. I thought, how can an actor suggest such truth? Hide
[on often appearing as emotionally repressed characters] I think there's an immense drama in things Show more [on often appearing as emotionally repressed characters] I think there's an immense drama in things being held back and hidden and unspoken. I'm the go- to guy when you're doing something in that convention. But also, communication is never perfect. What you're hearing isn't necessarily what I'm imagining you're hearing. That interests me more than repression. Hide
[on the appeal he has to older female fans] I find I'm increasingly lusted after by people beyond pe Show more [on the appeal he has to older female fans] I find I'm increasingly lusted after by people beyond pensionable age. I was told of a woman in hospital, diagnosed with high blood pressure, who was told not to watch any more Pride and Prejudice (1995). She was 103. Hide
Actually, you know, it is quite extraordinary because life on a film set is inherently infantile. Ev Show more Actually, you know, it is quite extraordinary because life on a film set is inherently infantile. Everything else is taken away to the point where we are helpless. You are picked up at a certain time of day. You are driven to a place not of your choice. You are then given clothes to put on. And then someone does your hair and your face, and again according to someone else's schedule. You are brought your breakfast. Then you are taken to a place where you do your job and you are told where to stand, where to look, and here are the words you are going to say, and they're not yours. And so there is very little that you have in your control, except what happens when you close the bathroom door. It is preposterous. It makes no sense whatsoever, unless it's wonderful. You are always treading that line. Hide
Through my film work, I've tended to represent precisely the kind of Englishman that I'm not - the r Show more Through my film work, I've tended to represent precisely the kind of Englishman that I'm not - the repressed figure of mythology. It's hard to run into those guys now. I'll give you £100 for every guy with a bowler hat and umbrella you see walking the streets of London who's not going to a fancy dress party. My generation weren't saying, I can't wait to grow up so I can put on a pin-stripe suit and go to an office. They were piercing their ears and learning to play the guitar. If you want to define a modern Englishman, you might as well look at Keith Richards, John Lydon or Ray Winstone, rather than John Major or Prince Charles. Hide
Every single film since [Pride and Prejudice (1995)] there's been a scene where someone goes, "Well Show more Every single film since [Pride and Prejudice (1995)] there's been a scene where someone goes, "Well I think you've just killed Mr Darcy". But he is a figure that won't die. He is wandering somewhere. I can't control him. I tried to play with it in Bridget Jones's Diary (2001). I've never resented it: if it wasn't for him I might be languishing, but part of me thinks I should do this postmodern thing, change my name by deed poll to Mr Darcy. Then people can come up to me and say, 'But you are not Mr Darcy' which would be different. I dare say it will be my saving grace when the only employment available to me is opening supermarkets dressed in breeches and a wig. Hide
I feel quite strongly about anti-Americanism. I share people's grievances about the current Administ Show more I feel quite strongly about anti-Americanism. I share people's grievances about the current Administration but I remember my father and I watching the Watergate hearings. Here was a country arraigning its own leaders. America has a fantastic history of dissent. (Sept. 2007) Hide
[Accepting his Best Actor BAFTA for A Single Man (2009)] An encounter with Tom Ford is to come away Show more [Accepting his Best Actor BAFTA for A Single Man (2009)] An encounter with Tom Ford is to come away feeling resuscitated, a little more worldly, better informed, better groomed, more fragrant and more nominated than one has ever been before. Hide
The English people, a lot of them, would not be able to understand a word of spoken Shakespeare. The Show more The English people, a lot of them, would not be able to understand a word of spoken Shakespeare. There are people who do and I'm not denying they exist. But it's a far more philistine country than people think. Hide
[on The King's Speech (2010) co-star Helena Bonham Carter] If I had to choose somebody to get stuck Show more [on The King's Speech (2010) co-star Helena Bonham Carter] If I had to choose somebody to get stuck in a lift with, actually, she comes fairly high on the list. Because she's amusing, attractive, and very small. Hide
I like playing strange characters. Some people might say it has something to do with a hidden part o Show more I like playing strange characters. Some people might say it has something to do with a hidden part of myself, but I think it's a lot simpler than that: normal people are just not very interesting. Hide
[on his success in playing the two Mr. Darcy roles] I was delighted to become a popular culture refe Show more [on his success in playing the two Mr. Darcy roles] I was delighted to become a popular culture reference point. I'm still delighted about it actually, and I still find it to be weird. Hide
Your face is supposed to move if you're going to act. Why on earth would you take a violin and make Show more Your face is supposed to move if you're going to act. Why on earth would you take a violin and make the strings so that they don't vibrate? Injecting something in to your face so it's paralysed, or cutting bits of it up so that you take any signs of life out of it is catastrophic if you're going to express yourself in any way at all. Hide
Actors are basically drag queens. People will tell you they act because they want to heal mankind or Show more Actors are basically drag queens. People will tell you they act because they want to heal mankind or, you know, explore the nature of the human psyche. Yes, maybe. But basically we just want to put on a frock and dance. Hide
[on accepting a Golden Globe Award for The King's Speech (2010)] Right now, this is all that stands Show more [on accepting a Golden Globe Award for The King's Speech (2010)] Right now, this is all that stands between me and a Harley Davidson. Hide
[on looking ten years ahead] I always imagined I'd move beyond this rather infantile career choice. Show more [on looking ten years ahead] I always imagined I'd move beyond this rather infantile career choice. By this point I would have become a virtuoso on a musical instrument or written novels or become an astronaut. But I'll probably be doing some version of exactly what I'm doing now. Hide
[accepting the Best Actor Oscar for The King's Speech (2010)] I've a feeling my career's just peaked Show more [accepting the Best Actor Oscar for The King's Speech (2010)] I've a feeling my career's just peaked. Hide
I have a kind of neutrality, physically, which has helped me. I have a face that can be made to look Show more I have a kind of neutrality, physically, which has helped me. I have a face that can be made to look a lot better or a lot worse, depending on how I want it to look. Hide
Colin Firth's FILMOGRAPHY
as Actor (48)
Colin Firth Colin Firth'S roles
Harry Hart
Harry Hart

Fred
Fred

George VI
George VI

Ron Lax
Ron Lax

Bill Haydon
Bill Haydon

Stanley
Stanley

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